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Center for Oral History
University of Hawai‘i at Manoa • Social Science Research Institute
2560 Campus Road
George Hall 212
Honolulu, HI 96822

 

 

Center for Oral History > Recent

 

Access COH transcripts online at ScholarSpace

Life Histories of Native Hawaiians, Waialua and Hale‘wa: The People Tell Their Story, Waipi‘o: Mano Wai, Kona Heritage Stores, Hui Panala‘au: Hawaiian Colonists in the Pacific, 1935–1942 and Captive on the U.S. Mainland: Oral Histories of Hawai‘i-born Nisei interview transcripts in Adobe portable document format (.pdf ) are available at ScholarSpace, an open-access, digital institutional repository for the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. More projects will become available as they are scanned and uploaded.

To access ScholarSpace, click or copy and paste in your browser window address bar: http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/ handle/10125/21087.

How to capture women’s stories through oral history

Warren Nishimoto, COH director, and Maria Orr, Kaimipono Consulting Services, will teach you how to conduct, transcribe, and edit oral history interviews, with women-specific strategies to best bring out their life experiences.

It takes place on Saturday, June 23, 2012, from 9:30 am to 4 pm at the Atherton Halau, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street in Honolulu. For more information and to register online go to the Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History site.

Sponsored by the Bishop Museum, Hawaiian Mission Houses Historic Site and Archives, Kamehameha Schools, and Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities.

 

Talking Hawai‘i’s story: listening to and preserving stories of our elders

Warren Nishimoto, director of the UH-Manoa Center for Oral History, will speak on the Center’s work documenting Hawai‘i’s history from the perspective of those who lived it on Wednesday, November 16, 2:30–3:30 pm, in George Hall 301B, UHM campus.

Joining Nishimoto will be actors/storytellers Nyla Fujii-Babb and William Ha‘o, who will read the life stories of Martina Kekuewa Fuentevilla and Stanley Mendes, respectively.

Born in 1908, Martina Kekuewa Fuentevilla lived with ‘Ana Lo‘e Ma‘inui and Makia Ma‘inui as their hanai granddaughter in Honaunau, Kona, Hawai‘i. Martina’s early life in South Kona centered around farming and fishing. She later was an entertainer, song composer, and hat weaver. The reading is based on three Hawaiian-language interviews conducted and translated by Larry Kimura in 1981 for the COH project, A Social History of Kona.

Born in 1931 on the Big Island, Stanley Clifford Mendes grew up in the plantation community of Pa‘auilo. In 1944, he began his forty-year career in the sugar industry, first with Hamakua Mill Company and later, through company mergers, with Laupahoehoe Sugar Company and Davies Hamakua Sugar Company. This narrative covers Stanley’s youth and jobs. Also shared are observations on the end of the sugar industry and plantation lifestyle. The reading is based on two interviews conducted by Warren Nishimoto in 1996 for the COH project, The Closing of Sugar Plantations: Interviews with Families of Hamakua and Ka‘u, Hawai‘i.

 

Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History

The oral histories of public health nurse Harriet Kuwamoto and social worker Jennie In will be featured in the presentation "Public Health Nursing and Social Workers of 20th Century Palama Settlement" by COH director Warren Nishimoto at the 2011 Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History program, on Saturday, October 29, at the Hawai‘i Convention Center.

 

Women in World War II Hawai‘i: An Era of Change

A presentation exploring the dramatic and far-reaching effects that World War II had on the lives of Hawai‘i’s women is scheduled for Thursday, March 31, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Judiciary History Center’s restored 1913 Courtroom. The presentation will feature DeSoto Brown, Collections Manager, Bishop Museum Archives, as he reveals women’s roles while living within the war zone of the Territory of Hawai‘i under martial law. This will be followed by narratives of oral history interviews that describe women’s hardships, sacrifices, and newfound benefits. Presenters Dr. Warren Nishimoto, and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Center for Oral History, University of Hawai‘i, and Nyla Fujii-Babb, storyteller, actress, and producer will feature stories shared by women in Hawai‘i during World War II.

The program is funded in part by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities with additional support from the “We the People” initiative of the NEH.

 

Brown Bag Biography presentation

Warren Nishimoto, Director, UH-Manoa Center for Oral History, will present “Talking, and Acting, Hawai‘i’s Story: Bringing Oral History to Page and Stage.” The presentation will take place on Thursday, March 3, 12 to 1:15 pm, Center for Biographical Research, Henke Hall 325.

 

Japanese American Internment During World War II

Jane Kurahara and Betsy Lum of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i will be the featured guests of hosts Michi Kodama-Nishimoto and Warren Nishimoto (UH-Manoa Center for Oral History) on the call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud: Talking Issues, Taking Action,” Monday, February 28, 6:30 to 7:30 pm, on 1210 AM KZOO. The topic will be Japanese American Internment During World War II: Honouliuli and Other Sites.

Call in questions/comments at (808) 941-5966.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by the UH Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Oral History, and College of Social Sciences.

Past programs are archived on the KZOO website.

 

Mahele ‘Ike Lecture Series at Pohai Nani

Readings of oral history narratives collected and edited by the UH-Manoa’s Center for Oral History will be presented at the Pohai Nani auditorium (45-090 Namoku Street, Kane‘ohe) on Thursday, February 24, from 7 to 8 pm.

The program will feature readings, presented by storyteller Nyla Fujii-Babb and actor Wil Ha‘o, followed by a question-and-answer session led by the COH’s Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto.

Fujii-Babb will read Martina Kekuewa Fuentevilla’s narrative, “Hanai Granddaughter,” focused on the Native Hawaiian lifestyle of early 20th century Kona. Ha‘o will read rice-and-taro farmer Nelson Ah Hoy Chun’s narrative, “Nature's Work,” focused on the lifestyle experienced in the Big Island’s Waipi‘o Valley.

The event is part of the Pohai Nani Retirement Community’s Mahele ‘Ike Lecture Series on Hawai‘i. Admission is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Carolyn Nakamura, Pohai Nani’s resident services coordinator, at (808) 236-7805.

 

Faculty Lecture Series features Talking Hawai‘i’s Story

UH-Manoa Center for Oral History’s Michi Kodama-Nishimoto and Warren S. Nishimoto are the Faculty Lecture Series’ guest speakers on Wednesday, February 9 from 3:30 to 4:30 pm. The long-time oral historians will share excerpts from their book, Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People, at Hamilton Library, room 301. Doors open at 3:15 pm. Admission is free and refreshments will be provided. 

The Faculty Lecture Series is presented by the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education, the  Office of Research Relations, and the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa library.

 

Pacific Historic Parks programs

Paul Heintz joins host, Warren Nishimoto (UH-Manoa Center for Oral History), on the radio program “Thinking Out Loud” on AM 1210 KZOO, Monday, December 6, at 6:30 p.m. Topic: Education Programs at Pacific Historic Parks

To join the on-air discussion, call (808) 941-5966 or email during the program.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by the UH Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Oral History, and College of Social Sciences.

Past programs are archived on the KZOO website.

 

World World II veteran will discuss experiences

Ted Tsukiyama, HTG, VVV, 442nd RCT, 522 FAB, and MIS veteran, joins hosts Michi Kodama-Nishimoto and Warren Nishimoto (UH-Manoa Center for Oral History) on the call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud,” on AM 1210 KZOO, Monday, November 15,  6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

To join the on-air discussion, call (808) 941-5966 or email during the program.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by the UH Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Oral History, and College of Social Sciences.

Past programs are archived on the KZOO website.

 

Words of War, Lessons of Peace: A Multigenerational Symposium for Peacemaking

“Words of War, Lessons of Peace: A Multigenerational Symposium for Peacemaking” features the personal experiences and recollections of civilians impacted by World War II. The symposium will be held on Sunday, November 21, from 1 to 3 p.m. at UH Manoa’s Architecture Auditorium.

Izumi Hirano, a Hawai‘i-born Nisei who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima will speak about his wartime and postwar experiences, and Helene Minehira, whose family was evicted from their home near Pearl Harbor solely on the basis of race, will speak about her wartime fears and the disruption of family life.

The oral history narratives of Alfred Preis, a German national incarcerated as an enemy alien at Sand Island Detention Camp, and of Gussie Ornellas, a Kalihi Valley resident who lost two daughters to American anti-aircraft fire on December 7, 1941, will be read.

The slam poetry of Darron Cambra; the winning entries of elementary, middle, and high school students who submitted their work to the Write for Peace Contest; and peace-themed art from ‘Iolani School students will also be featured.

Organized by William S. Richardson School of Law JD candidate Scott T. Nishimoto, the event is free and open to the public. On-campus parking is free. Contact Scott Nishimoto at (808) 783-6641.

The symposium is co-sponsored by UH Manoa’s William S. Richardson School of Law, Center for Oral History, Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, Ethnic Studies Department, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, and Soto Mission of Hawai‘i.

 

Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History Program

Saturday, October 23, 2010
Hawai‘i Convention Center Theater 310
1:35–2:20 pm

COH’s Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, with storyteller Nyla Fujii-Babb, present “Women in an Era of Change.” This presentation uses narratives, based on oral history interviews, to illustrate the hardships, sacrifices, and benefits experienced by women in World War II Hawai‘i. Stories include: Gussie Lopez Ornellas, a Kalihi resident of Portuguese heritage, who lost daughters to U.S. military anti-aircraft fire on December 7, 1941; Ruth Ishibashi Yamaguchi, evicted from Pearl Harbor-area home by U.S. authorities solely on the basis of her Japanese ancestry; Agnes Rho Chun, wartime civilian of Korean heritage, who worked at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard; Elizabeth Lindsey Kimura, Native Hawaiian Big Island resident who was impacted by the military presence in Waimea; and Mary Samson Hendrickson, a Filipino student on Kaua‘i, who worked in the WARD (Women’s Air Raid Defense).

The Distinctive Women in Hawaiian History Program is funded in part by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities with additional support from the “We the People” initiative of the NEH.

 

Hui Panala‘au: Hawaiian Colonists, American Citizens

Join “Thinking Out Loud” radio hosts Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto on Monday, October 4, 6:30 to 7:30 pm at 1210 AM KZOO to discuss Hui Panala‘au: Hawaiian Colonists, American Citizens. Read about the Hui Panala‘au project.

To participate in the on-air discussion, call (808) 941-5966 or email during the program.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by the UH Center for Japanese Studies; UH Center for Oral History, College of Social Sciences; Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i; Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

Past programs are archived on the KZOO website.

 

Hiroshima atomic bomb survivor will speak on radio program

Mr. Izumi Hirano, a kibei-nisei Hiroshima atomic bomb survivor, will be speaking about his wartime experiences and postwar efforts to assist survivors, on the call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud,” on AM 1210 KZOO on Monday, September 13,  6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

If you would like to join the on-air discussion, call (808) 941-5966 or email during the program.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by the UH Center for Japanese Studies; UH Center for Oral History, College of Social Sciences; Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i; Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

Past programs are archived on the KZOO website.

 

In Their Own Words: Voices of Hawai‘i’s Past

In Their Own Words: Voices of Hawai‘i’s Past, paired readings from Bamboo Ridge and COH’s anthology Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People, was taped at the fifth annual Hawai‘i Book and Music Festival on May 16, 2010. The two-part program will air September 7 and 14 at at 6:30 pm on Aloha Shorts, KIPO 89.3 FM.

The first broadcast features “Hawai‘i, Plantation of Destiny” by Virgilio Felipe, read by Troy Apostol; “Severo Dinson” read by Wayland Quintero; “Lemon ‘Rusty’ Holt” read by Wil Kahele; and “The Long Swim” by Michael McPherson, read by Moses Goods.

The second broadcast features “Venicia Damasco Guiala” read by Donalyn Dela Cruz; “On Hearing My Mother Call Out to Our Neighbor Over the Courtyard Fence” by Amalia Bueno, read by Kiana Rivera; “Robert Kiyoshi Hasegawa” read by Dann Seki; and “Wartime” by Juliet S. Kono, read by Kat Koshi.

Aloha Shorts is a locally produced radio program of writings from Bamboo Ridge Press performed by Hawai‘i’s actors. The shows are broadcast every Tuesday at 6:30 pm on Hawai‘i Public Radio’s KIPO 89.3 FM. Tapings and broadcasts are supported in part by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities. Past shows are archived at Bamboo Ridge.

 

Storytelling and oral history

Nyla Fujii-Babb joins hosts, Michi Kodama-Nishimoto and Warren Nishimoto of the UH Manoa’s Center for Oral History, on the KZOO AM 1210 call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud” on Monday, July 19, 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm. They will discuss storytelling, drama, and oral history. To join the on-air discussion, call (808) 941-5966 or email KZOO.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by UH Manoa’s Center for Japanese Studies and College of Social Sciences, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i; the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; and Barnes & Noble Bookstores. Past shows are archived on the KZOO website.

 

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story discussion and reading at Pohai Nani

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People editors Michi Kodama-Nishimoto and Warren Nishimoto will speak at the Pohai Nani Auditorium (45-090 Namoku Street, Kane‘ohe) on Tuesday evening, July 6, from 7 to 8 p.m. The program will also include readings from the book by storyteller Nyla Fujii-Babb and English professor Craig Howes, followed by a question-and-answer session. Fujii-Babb will read Edith Anzai Yonenaka’s narrative, “Recollections from the Windward Side,” and Howes will read Alfred Preis’ compelling chapter, “Interned: Experiences of an ‘Enemy Alien.’” The free talk and reading is the third event in the Pohai Nani Retirement Community’s Yamashita Lecture Series on Hawai‘i. The program is open to the public and books will be available from the UH Press for purchase. For more information about the event, contact Carolyn Nakamura, Pohai Nani’s resident services coordinator, at 236-7805.

 

Radio program features Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War” exhibit and events

UH Manoa William S. Richardson School of Law professor Mari Matsuda joins hosts Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto on the call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud: Talking Issues, Taking Action.”

Matsuda serves as director of a Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities project, Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War.” The project is bringing to Hawai‘i the exhibit of the same name and related activities, beginning June 26, 2010. 

To learn more about the project, tune in to AM 1210 KZOO on Monday, June 7, from 6:30–7:30 p.m.  Join the on-air discussion by calling (808) 941-5966 or emailing KZOO.

“Thinking Out Loud” is sponsored by UH Manoa’s Center for Japanese Studies and College of Social Sciences, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i; the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities; and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

 

COH awards Hawai‘i State History Day prizes

The Center for Oral History presented its annual Hawai‘i History Day awards for “Outstanding Historical Research Using Oral Histories.”

Sponsored by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, Hawai‘i History Day showcases student research on history and civics themes. Projects include displays, performances, documentaries, essays, and websites.The program celebrated its twentieth anniversary this year.

The recipients of COH cash awards were: Youth (grades 4–5) Division: Hailey Hunt of Mokapu Elementary School on O‘ahu for her three-paneled exhibit entitled “USS Growler: The U.S. Navy’s Innovative Nuclear Warfare Deterrent.” Hailey’s teacher is Lori Kidani. Senior (grades 9–12) Division: Kailana Ritte-Camara, Tracilyn Sagario, and Maluhia Mendes-Medeiros of Moloka‘i High School for a video documentary entitled “Makahiki.” Their teacher is Gandharva Ross. Moloka‘i High students participated in Hawai‘i History Day for the first time this year.

 

1946 tsunami remembered on radio program

The 1946 tsunami in Hawai‘i and present-day efforts to increase tsunami awareness will be discussed on “Thinking Out Loud,” a call-in radio program on KZOO 1210 AM on Monday, May 24, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Jeanne Branch Johnston, survivor of the 1946 tsunami and co-founder of the Tsunami Museum in Hilo, Hawai‘i, joins hosts UH Manoa Center for Oral History’s Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto. To share comments or questions, call (808) 941-5966 or email KZOO. The program is sponsored by the UH Manoa’s Center for Japanese Studies and College of Social Sciences, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

 

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story wins book award

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People, edited by COH’s Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Warren S. Nishimoto, and Cynthia A. Oshiro, has won Honorable Mention in the non-fiction category of the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association’s Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards. The awards honor the best books published in 2009. Here is the full list of the award winners. Talking Hawai‘i’s Story is published by the University of Hawai‘i Press for COH and the Biographical Research Center.

 

“Aloha Shorts” readings at Hawai‘i Book and Music Festival

Aloha Shorts will be presenting readings from Bamboo Ridge Press paired with narratives from the UH Center for Oral History’s  recent collection Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People. This special Aloha Shorts installment entitled “In their Own Words; Voices of Hawai‘i’s Past” at Mission Memorial Auditorium on Sunday, May 16th at 11 a.m. is free and open to the public.

The program’s host, Cedric Yamanaka, and the program’s quirky house band, Hamajang, open the program at this special taping. Readings will include excerpts from the oral history of Venicia Damasco Guiala, a Lana‘i pineapple field worker, read by Donalyn Dela Cruz, paired with Amalia Bueno’s humorous “On Hearing My Mother Call Out To Our Neighbor Over the Courtyard Fence” performed by Kiana Rivera. Dann Seki voices the words of well-known labor leader Robert Kiyoshi Hasegawa, framed by two poems by Juliet S. Kono, “Grandmother and the War” and “Wartime,” both read by Kat Koshi. The Bamboo Ridge piece “Hawai‘i, Plantation of Memory” by Virgilio Felipe and read by Troy Apostal is paired with the oral history narrative of Severo Dinson read by Wayland Quintero. Lemon “Rusty” Holt’s kolohe tales of his youth in Waikiki, read by Wil Kahele, are followed by Moses Goods III’s reading of Michael McPherson’s “The Long Swim.”

Aloha Shorts is a locally produced radio program of writings from Bamboo Ridge Press performed by Hawai‘i actors. The shows usually tape before a live audience on the first Sunday of every month and are broadcast every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. on Hawai‘i Public Radio’s KIPO 89.3 FM. Visit Bamboo Ridge or Hawai‘i Public Radio for more information or to listen to podcasts. Podcasts are also available for download at Aloha Shorts. Aloha Shorts is co-produced by Sammie Choy, Craig Howes, and Phyllis Look. Tapings and broadcasts are sponsored in part by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities.

 

Helene Minehira shares World War II experiences

Helene Minehira, whose family was one of many Japanese American families forcibly removed from their homes near Pearl Harbor at the outbreak of World War II, will talk about her wartime experiences and her involvement in the redress movement with hosts Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto on “Thinking Out Loud,” a call-in radio program, on Monday, April 19, 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm. Tune in to radio station KZOO 1210 AM.

To share comments or questions, call (808) 941-5966 or email KZOO.

The radio program is sponsored by UH Manoa’s College of Social Sciences and Center for Japanese Studies, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

 

Radio forum features Hawai‘i-born World War II incarceree

Warren Nishimoto and Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, both of the UH Manoa Center for Oral History, will host Lily Hatanaka, a Hawai‘i-born World War II incarceree, on the call-in radio program, “Thinking Out Loud.”

The discussion will focus on the wartime experiences and observations of Hatanaka who was removed from San Diego and incarcerated at Santa Anita Assembly Center and Poston Relocation Camp. She is one of several Hawai‘i-born incarcerees now being interviewed by the UH Manoa Center for Oral History in a federally-funded project entitled, “Captive on the US Mainland.”

To join the discussion on Monday, March 22, from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. on 1210 AM KZOO, call (808) 941-5966 or email KZOO.

The radio program is sponsored by UH Manoa’s College of Social Sciences and Center for Japanese Studies, the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, and Barnes & Noble Bookstores.

 

COH seeks Hawai‘i Nisei incarcerated in WWII

The Center for Oral History (COH) seeks to interview Hawai‘i-born Japanese Americans who  were removed from their places of study, training, or employment on the West Coast and incarcerated in various assembly centers and relocation camps during World War II. There were over 3,000 Japanese American students enrolled in institutions of higher learning in California, Washington, and Oregon at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941. Among these students were some from Hawai‘i, including men and women seeking not only bachelor’s degrees but advanced degrees for which training was not available in the islands. In addition to college students, there were Hawai‘i-born Japanese Americans who were living with relatives, completing their high school education, entering vocational schools, or working on the West Coast. In 1942, these Hawai‘i-born Nisei along with other persons of Japanese ancestry on the West Coast were incarcerated in various camps by Executive Order 9066.

Hawai‘i-born Nisei, present on the West Coast and incarcerated in 1942, are being sought to participate in a COH project entitled “Captive on the US Mainland: Oral Histories of Hawai‘i-born Nisei.” The project is funded by a grant from the National Park Service.

The interviews will focus on the Hawai‘i-born Niseis’ childhood and youth in Hawai‘i, pre-WWII experiences on the West Coast, incarceration and release, as well as their postwar experiences. The goal of the project is to inform the public that World War II confinement and its impact were not limited to the older, more established Hawai‘i Japanese and their families. Young Hawai‘i Nisei—striving to realize the American Dream on the West Coast—were also subject to confinement.

Anyone with knowledge of persons able and willing to participate in this project may call Center for Oral History Director Warren Nishimoto at 808-956-6260 or email wnishimo@hawaii.edu.

 

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People

Talking Hawai‘i’s Story: Oral Histories of an Island People, edited by Michi Kodama-Nishimoto, Warren S. Nishimoto, and Cynthia A. Oshiro, is the first major book in over a generation to present a rich sampling of the landmark work of the Center for Oral History. Twenty-nine extensive oral histories introduce readers to the sights and sounds of territorial Waikiki, to the feeling of community in Palama, in Kona, or on the island of Lana‘i, and even to the experience of a German national interned by the military government after Pearl Harbor. The result is a collection that preserves Hawai‘i’s social and cultural history through the narratives of the people who lived it—co-workers, neighbors, family members, and friends.

Published by the University of Hawai‘i Press for the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa’s Center for Oral History and Center for Biographical Research. For more information, contact the Center for Oral History (phone: 808-956-6260).

 

Uchinanchu: A History of Okinawans in Hawai‘i third printing

Uchinanchu: A History of Okinawans in Hawai‘i is now in its third printing. Uchinanchu supports and promotes pride in the unique culture, history, and contributions of Okinawans in Hawai‘i. It also adds another chapter to our understanding of the islands’ rich, diverse, multi-ethnic heritage. Published by the Center for Oral History and the Hawai‘i United Okinawa Association with a grant from the Japan Foundation and with the assistance of the Center for Okinawan Studies and the Center for Japanese Studies. Distributed by the University of Hawai‘i Press.

For more information, contact the Center for Oral History (phone: 808-956-6165).

 

Journal spotlights oral history in educational research

Qualitative methodologies are playing an increasingly prominent role in educational research. By providing opportunities to examine educational issues through individual lenses, they offer diverse perspectives on important societal issues. They also offer access to the thoughts behind the policies and actions of particular individuals.

Oral history—the collection, preservation, and dissemination of historical data obtained through planned, in-depth, life history interviews—is one qualitative methodology used by researchers to address issues relating to learning, teaching, and the role of schools in society.

Educational Perspectives, the journal of the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa College of Education, has devoted its issue number 2, volume 40, to oral history research. Guest editor Warren Nishimoto, director of the UH Center for Oral History and instructor in the Department of Educational Foundations, provides an introduction.

Edited from oral history interviews, seven narratives, preceded by biographical summaries, are contained in this issue. Interviewees include teachers Albert Like, Amy Fern, and Marion Lee Loy; lower education administrators Laurence Capellas and R. Burl Yarberry; and higher education administrators Andrew In and Harlan Cleveland.

As witnesses and participants in the developments that occurred in public education in the twentieth century, the interviewees share their observations and stories.

Single print copies may be purchased for $25 from Educational Perspectives, College of Education, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Wist Hall Room 113, 1776 University Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96822. Download the journal in pdf format from the College of Education website.

 

Project captures stories of Nisei veterans

The University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and Kapi‘olani Community College join forces in a three-year project to capture the life stories of American Hawai‘i-born World War II veterans of Japanese ancestry. The platform for public access is an interactive website with high-resolution online viewing and streaming media capability.

This community-based project, made possible with the support of former UH Manoa Chancellor Peter Englert, began in response to requests made by several Hawai‘i Americans of Japanese Ancestry (AJA) veterans for UH-Manoa to not only preserve but to tell their life stories.

The Center for Oral History will videotape and transcribe thirty life history interviews of veterans. World War II and the pre- and postwar experiences of interviewees will be placed in the context of individual lives and historical events. Interviewees will include members of the Varsity Victory Volunteers as well as veterans from each major AJA military unit, including the 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Military Intelligence Service, and 1399th Engineer Construction Battalion. Women related to veterans or who served in a military capacity will also be interviewed.

Kapi‘olani Community College Library will provide digital processing and website development, utilizing audio-clips, video-clips, historical photos, artifact images, documents, and secondary written sources, as well as full-text transcripts.

Hamilton Library will serve as repository for the videotaped interviews and transcripts. The interviews, transcripts, and website will complement the library’s ongoing efforts to develop an archival collection of veterans’ personal letters, manuscripts, documents, and artifacts.

For more information, call COH at 808-956-6259 or email Warren Nishimoto at wnishimo@hawaii.edu.

 

 

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